Archives for posts with tag: science

But please— do yourself a favor and check out the press gallery for this Hubble 20th celebration. There’s a lot more than just the feature photo. It’s a nice time to be a space person

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Thumbs down for that. Thumbs up for a sunny afternoon outing here:

I added some other photos to the Picasa albums— including the start of a Science section. So far it mostly just consists of this photo from my multihour charcoal hunt the other day:

Can you spot the charcoal? It’s the shiny dark black ones— unless it’s hiding beneath a dirty rind.

It’s probably hiding beneath a dirty rind.

We spruced up the page some— including fixing some nerdy stuff you don’t care about and adding links to some pretty pictures (up top) you might.

Also, they found spinel on the moon. I think (and Wikipedia confirms) that spinel, besides being a metamorphic mineral, shows up in chemically primitive mantle rocks, like peridotite, so it makes a little sense to show up on the volcanic, olivine-rich moon but, still, not something they were expecting to see.

Spinel, from Wikimedia Commons (through NASA)

In other not-expecting-to-see news, I’ll have a lot more to say about this in the future but, for some reason, it appears that even though they redshift as expected, quasars don’t show time dilation. That sentence should make cosmologists uncomfortable six ways from Sunday.

Here’s a real email I received at 7:56 today, the first day of labs for the quarter.

“(My name),

I made a very bad mistake thinking my lab was thursday and just realized i missed the first day, so I was hoping that you could tell me what I missed and where to go from here, possible even meet sometime to get what i missed. I emailed Dr. (Professor) already, so i could appreciate if there’s anything you could do for me or what i need to do. THank you, (his name)”

And here’s a completely real event I heard about for the first time today.

Later that decade, Davis led a quasi-covert operation that recorded the vaginal contractions of ballerinas with the Boston Ballet and other women, then translated this impetus of human conception into text, music, phonetic speech and ultimately into radio signals, which were beamed from M.I.T.’s Millstone radar to Epsilon Eridani, Tau Ceti and two other nearby star systems… The Air Force soon found out about the million-watt Poetica Vaginal broadcast, as Davis calls it, and shut it down.

..

“The images of humans placed aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft show impeccably groomed men that lack any facial and body hair,” Davis hoots, “and women with no external genitalia.” Poetica Vaginal was in part a response to this curious censorship. “By making this attempt to communicate with the other,” he explains, “we’re really communicating with ourselves.”